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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
-election in wisconsin for congress. state law allows him to do that as well as running for the vice presidency, but what challenges does that present? >> it's just that it can look bad. but i would also point out that joe biden also was running for re-election for the senate in delaware when he was brarack obama's running mate four years ago. so this is a pretty commonplace thing to do. >> all right, matt visor from "the boston globe" and erin mcpike from real clear politics, thank you both. >> thank you. >>> coming up, new polls out today show mitt romney with a double-digit deficit in his running mate's home state. we will give you the latest spread on that. >>> but first, which president obama is preparing to emerge at the next debate? we'll talk to his campaign's vice chairwoman, next. this is msnbc. ♪ most paints have color that sits on the surface. but nothing beats benjamin moore's color lock technology that locks color right in, no matter how often you wash it. color lock technology. exclusively from your benjamin moore retailer. find your perfect color with a buy one, get one pint offer. visi
. however, county by county, they can have the final say? >> well, thomas, the courts just reset the law. it went back to the original law in the state of ohio. so, all along it was up to the county boards of elections, but since the debacle of 2004, county boards have been allowing that last three days, especially in the urban counties. and let us not forget that the type of voting that the secretary of state has cut out has a disproportionate impact on african-american voters. there was just a study that came out that said that african-americans are 26 times more likely to vote early and in person than any other voter in the state of ohio. so, make no mistake about it, the republicans are doing everything they can, whether it's on the federal level or the state level, to try to target african-american voters and poor voters, but this is a victory for all voters in the state of ohio now that the last three days, the boards of elections have that discretion, but it is a victory. >> but if the secretary of state, as you say, has been trying to get this to be a tighter time period, what's
. with the republican-led state houses trying to change the laws. was there too much emphasis put on that? >> first of all, find it extremely insulting to say there was any effort by anyone to suppress the vote. i find that unbelievably insulting and -- >> would you say that with the federal panel that texas -- >> we -- they want -- >> sean works you say that to the federal panel that supports unfair burden against the poor, allotting it to a poll tax, they said this was a poll tax and would be voter suppression in texas and would not be happening there. like they are utilizing in other states. >> okay. so -- in the state of rhode island which i think -- my home state which is pretty controlled by the democratic party, they didn't see too much outrage there when they did it. i think when you look at every poll that's ever come out, 70% to 80% of americans support this, so i think that somehow equate showing a photo i.d. which in most states is given -- free if there is an issue with the person's economic condition, then somehow requiring people to show the same type of thing had would be required t
set of personal beliefs, but he didn't need to impose those through law. that said, i think what happened, it took out the need for both of them to address it in a real way the role of government and the state because they were asked, talk about this personally. what i liked about what vice president biden did was he brought it back to the role of government and said here are my personal feelings, but the issue is how government should behave. >> congressman ryan was talking about elected judges. >> absolutely. one of the things i think we often forget is that the president of the united states, his greatest legacy is consistently that federal judiciary. when we look at the issue of abortion, the longest legacy any president leaves are the appointments made to those federal benches. though this was a vice presidential debate, they are reflecting those same issues. >> the next president will be able to appoint two supreme court judges. >> argued there was rape, enforcible rape, in the case of rape or incest it was still, it would be a crime to engage in having an abortion. >> all
break down what is at stake here. this is daniel takaji, law professor and election law expert at ohio state university. thank you so much for being with me this afternoon, sir. >> well, thank you for having me. >> early voting of course has become a political battleground in and of itself. democrats see it as an edge because lower income people are oftentimes more likely to work odd hours. republicans say it's vulnerable to fraud. what is at play in the court's decision? >> well, what is in play in the decision from the sixth circuit, which the state of ohio is seeking to appeal to the supreme court is whether we will have early voting in ohio the saturday, sunday, and monday before the election. and this is potentially huge. in 2008, the obama campaign was very successful in getting its voters out during the early voting period, especially those last days. and that many people suspect why our republican secretary of state wants to shut down early voting those last three days. >> especially on sunday, a lot of folks who may not be familiar. i was just there a couple of weeks ago, full
was passion his health care law there. if the president is prepared for this debate and prepared to go after him on this issue, he could probably make a pretty good argument that mitt romney is probably not prepared to enter into this polarized congress with the experience he has and really bridge the gap between the two parties and break the gridlock >> glen, you've covered it for a long time. what do you make of the argument that he's the guy that reaches across the aisle and has a record of bipartisan sportsmanship if you will. >> a couple things that he says kind of belie what he said. he balanced the budget. he has to. in a state with 80% democratic legislature, he had to work with the democrats if he wanted to do anything. and most importantly, you've got to remember, december of '05, barely two and half years after taking office he announced he was not going to take a second term because he felt he had done all he could do with the legislate tlur. so he announced three years in office he was not going to seek a second term because he could no longer work with anything substantive. >>
's a struggle for the dignity that comes with freedom and opportunity and the right to live under laws of our own making. it's a struggle that's been unfolded under green banners in the streets of iran, in the public squares of tunisia and egypt and yemen and in the fights for liberty in iraq and afghanistan and libya. and now in syria. in short, it's a struggle between liberty and tyranny, justice and oppression, hope and despa despair. we've seen this struggle before. it is familiar to general george marshall. in his time, actions of world war was torn between democracy and despotism. we had leaders of courage and vision, both republicans and democrats, who knew that america had to support friends who shared our values and prevent today's crisis of tomorrow's conflicts. statesmen like marshall rallied the nation to rise to the responsibilities as the leader of the free world. we helped our friends to build and sustain free societies and free markets. we defended the friends and ourselves from our common enemies. we led. we led and though the path was long and uncertain, the thought of war i
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)